Brecon Beacons Waterfalls Walk

Waterfalls Walk

If you’re anything like me when it comes to planning your weekend walks and hikes, you’ll grab an OS Map and look for the high ground. When I was in the Brecon Beacons last week, the first walk I did fell into that category – I headed straight for Pen y Fan, the highest British peak south of Cadair Idris in Snowdonia. For this walk, I headed for these low altitude gems.

When you’re visiting a National Park renowned for it’s rugged and sweeping hills, barren moors and mountain scenery, it might not occur to you that some of the most impressive walks might be found in the valleys.

Thankfully, after watching The Brecon Beacons with Iolo Williams, I became enamoured with an area of dramatic limestone scenery in the Beacons known justly as Waterfall Country. Found south of the upland plateau of Fforest Fawr, this area of deep, narrow gorges is sheltered by the most vibrant and otherworldly woodland, interspersed with gushing waterfalls.

Truth be told, you don’t need a map for this one. The Waterfall Centre, where you’ll park your car, has some of the most well-signposted routes that you’ll find in any National Park – testament to just how popular the area is with walkers and tourists alike. As always though, I’d urge you to prepare as you normally would: make sure you have any kit you’d typically take into the mountains, including your waterproofs and a map that you know how to read.

The Waterfall Centre at Porth yr ogof, near Ystradfellte

There are a number of free laybys in the area that will all add a mile or so to your walk, but for the sake of convenience, park here. You’ll exit the car park and follow the clearly-signposted route to the riverbank of the Mellte, keeping it to your right as you weave between trees and rocks covered in the most vibrant ferns and moss.

Waterfalls Walk

Sgŵd Clun-gwyn

The first waterfall you’ll come to a mile or so after leaving the car park (though you’ll hear it long before you see it) is Sgŵd Clun-gwyn, the ‘fall of the white meadow’. It is formed where a north-northwest to south-southeast fault brings hard sandstone up against softer mudstone.

Waterfalls Walk 2
A staircase made of tree roots.

From here, you can pretty much make your own route, but due to resurfacing work that was happening on the paths when I visited, I took the middle of three available routes down to the lowest of the falls and worked my way back up. Rather than describing how to get to each of these (because it’s so obvious and well-signposted once you’re there), I’ll just give you a taster of what you can looked forward to.

Sgŵd yr Eira

On the Afon Hepste, Sgŵd yr Eira is famous for being the fall you can walk behind as the ‘falls of snow’ plunge over a hard band of sandstone.

Sgwd yr Eira
Sgŵd yr Eira

Sgŵd yr Pannwr

The ‘fall of the fuller’ or ‘fall of the woollen washer’ is the lowermost of the three falls on the Mellte. It’s a spectacular fall and the noise is deafening.

Sgwd yr Pannwr
Sgŵd yr Pannwr

 

Sgŵd Isaf Clun-gwyn

The ‘lower fall of the white meadow’ is the middle of three falls and, for me, the most impressive. It’s also the least obvious to get to and I suspect that some people miss it altogether having walked down to Sgŵd yr Pannwr and not realising that you can follow a boarded walk around a corner and over some rugged-looking rocks. It’s worth the extra effort, though, the view and the sound is astounding.

Sgwd Isaf Clun-gwyn
Sgŵd Isaf Clun-gwyn
Sgwd Isaf Clun-gwyn with Rainbow
Sgŵd Isaf Clun-gwyn with a rainbow emerging from the lower fall.

Normally, this is about the place where I’d point you in the direction of OS Maps and ViewRanger routes, but I’d urge you to explore this area and forge your own path. Everything you need to know can be found on the AA Walks website.

 

 

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