Adventure & Tech

Ordnance Survey have a wonderful initiative called #GetOutside. There aren’t many hashtags I rally around on social media and I’m pretty picky about the causes I support, but #GetOutside is one that I love. I can’t sum it up any better than Ordnance Survey’s own Nick Giles:

“The GetOutside initiative is core to OS’s aims to help more people to GetOutside more often, it is about inspiring adventures, enabling experiences and helping make memories. It’s already encouraging people to re-engage with the outdoors and showing that it is enjoyable, accessible and safe for all ages and abilities.

 

We all know the statistics. The shocking levels of obesity and inactivity within Great Britain, even amongst children. A sedentary lifestyle is easy, and it’s winning, and we’re seeing the effects of that on people’s mental and physical health. We appreciate people have busy lives and responsibilities, and that finding the time is not always easy, but we can all incorporate getting outside into our daily routines.”

I read a post last night shared (and presumably endorsed, but I’m making an assumption that may be incorrect) by one of the #GetOutside Champions. That article kept me up last night. It royally pissed me off.

I’m not going to name who wrote the article other than to say it wasn’t the person who shared it, nor am I going to link to it. All too often on social media a difference of opinion becomes personal despite each person having good intentions and seeing merit in each other’s ideas, so I’m going to talk about why I disagree with the theme. Mine will become another blog post floating in the ether that likely garners less than 1% of the views of the article I disagree with. If I had any social savvy or cared about clicks and likes, I’d probably link to it, create a discussion and, in the midst of my burgeoning popularity, people would forget that it’s ideas that should be challenged and not the people who hold them.

That shared blog post loftily stated that if you don’t use paper maps and instead use technology, you’re not a real outdoorsy-type. It went on to say that GPS devices are for ‘children and amateurs’.

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We need to lose this rhetoric otherwise a new generation of ‘children and amateurs’ won’t be encouraged to find out what our National Parks are like because they’ll be too worried about running into some holier-than-thou rambler with a ‘pocketable’ laminated map the size of a tablecloth in their hands, and a rehearsed lecture ready to go whenever the audience arises. Please don’t turn outdoor communities into an echo chamber where only real outdoors types post photos of themselves in places inferior city-dwelling types mustn’t tread; where the enlightened few can raise a pint of filtered bog water to each other before they bed down in an outcrop of heather having woven a mosquito net out of nothing but wild grass and wishes.

Don’t wear your outdoors skills like a badge of honour that puts you on a pedestal. Unless, of course, you’re doing DofE or in the Scouts or something; they’re pretty big on badges. Use your skills to inspire the intrepid and curious people who want to learn more. Don’t tell them they’re doing it wrong when they’ve only just started.

I wrote a post challenging the idea that paper maps are essential in all circumstances – it was surprisingly popular and got a lot of support, but I’m reluctant to repeat myself. I want, instead, to look at the other side of things. This idea that technology is bad, that GPS is cheating, that outdoors aides make you less of an outdoorsy type – these ideas need to die. They’re steeped in the past, they’re unhelpful and they don’t encourage anybody to discover our beautiful outdoor spaces. You know who’s going to be wandering our National Parks in 50-100 years? It won’t be you and me, it’ll be the younger generations we encourage to love the parks and their children. Stop demeaning them and making them feel like they’re not doing it right. In my view, we need to show them why there’s so much to love in the outdoors and the skills and knowledge will come later once the enthusiasm and thirst for more takes its hold. Let’s not put unnecessary barriers in their way.

My friend, Rob, is a driving instructor. He’s one of the best driving instructors in the county and is exceptionally talented at providing courses for people with learning difficulties or special needs. I know a similar argument has been happening for decades with (especially older) drivers bemoaning the use of in-car tech such as sat navs. I wanted to get Rob’s opinion on this because there’s an undeniable parallel between navigational tech in the car and orienteering tech in the outdoors – we’re just a long way behind. His response was so perfect, I’m going to post it in full:

Tech can help to reduce cognitive overload allowing a better focus on the true task in hand. In the context of driving, true driving is about what happens outside the window (judgement, assessment, interaction…) not the physical aspect of body movements – reducing the physical load allows greater brain processing on the true skills of driving. We shouldn’t be clinging onto 19th century tech for the sake of nostalgia when we have a better way. Even pen and paper is a tech which allows us to reduce cognitive overload, storing information outside the brain – at the time of its invention this was frowned upon. Even weather forecasting was frowned upon initially, anything new is seen as cheating or heresy.

I asked him to weigh in on how this might translate into the paper maps/GPS debate:

[The idea that analogue is better than digital] is very narrow-minded and works on the basis that we all perceive information the same way. We are a diverse species and our brains all work very differently, some can process paper maps well and that’s fantastic for them. Others will struggle, so a different form of processing should be sought and this is where technology can be wonderful as it provides alternative means to make sense of the same information. A map/satnav or any tech is simply an interface between ‘reality’ and the brain – we should each find what works for us best. I imagine that a lot of individuals with dyslexia/dyspraxia/Irlens Syndrome would struggle with map reading due to the perception issues – it would be insulting and crude to imply that they are lesser because of this. Technology can provide different means to access the same information allowing for the sheer diversity of brain types existent in the human race. Use whatever is necessary to make sense and enjoyment from the world around you. Technology is fantastic for this and it’s insulting that those who benefit are mocked by those who use a different style despite the fact they are using their own crutch (a map).

I may as well stop writing here. Rob said everything I wanted to say and managed to say it in a more eloquent way than I could.

When I wrote Is there still a place in your backpack for paper maps?, the answer was a resounding ‘yes’! I pretty much always have a paper map and compass in my bag for backup. I don’t think the arguments for using paper maps exclusively over technology such as phones and GPS stand up to scrutiny anymore, but I think map-reading and orienteering skills are incredibly helpful skills to have. Useful, yes. Pre-requisites, no.

If you’re the kind of person that blindly follows your sat nav along roads that you’re not supposed to be on and have routinely had to swerve to miss things like lakes after following a line on a screen, you should probably stay inside. A paper map isn’t going to solve your problems and Mountain Rescue have it hard enough as it is.

If, like me, you’re in love with that intersection between technology and the outdoors, I have good news. The Ordnance Survey app is very good and they’ve recently released a series of OS GPS devices which I hear are also very good reasonable. I haven’t tried one of those, but if I ever do I’ll report back. It really does encourage me to see that Ordnance Survey’s #GetOutside initiative and their Champions are having such a positive effect and that the company is striving to instil passion for the outdoors in the next generation. I just wish all ramblers were as forward-thinking.

You can follow Ordnance Survey on Twitter here, on Instagram here, and find out more about their #GetOutside initiative here. If you want to follow a few of my favourite #GetOutside Champions, who all make the outdoors both accessible and enjoyable, you can’t do much better than these three:

Kate Jamieson: Blog | Twitter | Instagram

Zoe Homes: Blog | Twitter | Instagram

Potty Adventures: Blog | Twitter | InstagramYouTube

Mark

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